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Kona Coast
11-01-2011, 07:47 PM (This post was last modified: 11-01-2011 08:19 PM by Gleneagles.)
Post: #1
Kona Coast
General store, downtown Miloli'i, April 1990 (Kodachrome)
Hikiau Heiau, Kealakekua Bay, April 1990 (Kodachromes)

This was a ceremonial center of the village where Captain Cook was received as a god (Lono), during the Hawaiian Makahiki festival, January 1779. On January 28th, Cook presided over the first Christian burial here.

"Hikiau Heiau was a luakini temple of Ancient Hawaii at the south end of the bay, at coordinates 19°28′31″N 155°55′9″W, associated with funeral rites.[4] The large platform of volcanic rock was originally over 16 feet (4.9 m) high, 250 feet (76 m) long, and 100 feet (30 m) wide.[5] --Wikipedia

These Kodachromes are not as crisp as modern digital photos, but they may be significant because the temple platform itself is now (to my knowledge) off-limits to visitors


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11-01-2011, 08:25 PM
Post: #2
RE: Kona Coast
Thank you for posting these old photos. It's very interesting to see what Hawaii was like back then. I really enjoyed looking at these photos.
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11-01-2011, 08:56 PM
Post: #3
RE: Kona Coast
Ha-hah! Victoria Nelson, in one of her chapters in the wonderful classic, My Time in Hawaii (1989), tells of her arrival in Hawaii in the late 1960s. "You should have seen it before it all got spoiled", she was told.

The funny thing is, every new visitor to Hawaii has been told that very same thing since the days of Captain Cook! It was told to Mark Twain in 1866; it was told to Jack London in 1900; it was told to James Michener and our GIs during WW2; it was told to the first passengers arriving by jet in the 1950s; and it is (as you have) still being said today.

Modern travelers always seem to have arrived "too late", and there's some truth to it, of course. Waikiki was a far different place in 1890 than it was to the vagabond songwriters of 1914, who brought the influence of ragtime music and created the "hapa-haole" musical genre ("Ukulele Lady", "My Little Grass Shack"). A friend of mine who lived in Kailua-Kona in the early 1970s remembers when the very first traffic light on the Big Island was installed, and how the locals used to drive for miles to test it out, somewhat amazed.

And the photo of Miloli'i I just posted was of a time (1990) when the village had no electricity! That village store had a large Coca-Cola ice chest of 1920s vintage, and you froze your hands to reach down inside the cold water from melted blocks of ice. The only other items on the store's shelves were some Nabisco saltine crackers and some cans of spam -- dat be it, bruddah! It was getting dark, and the storekeeper had to light his kerosene lamp.

But the amazing thing today is that you can still find that primitive, early 20th century atmosphere if you know where to look. Hawaii has undergone some radical changes since my first visit in 1988, but I'm sure the old Hawaii is still there. One of my most eagerly-awaited projects on my arrival (after settling in) will be to find those places. If they won't be "spoiled" by my reporting on them, I hope to share these discoveries to travelers who want to go deeper into the heart and soul of Hawaii.

--Bob




(11-01-2011 08:25 PM)kaniamea Wrote:  Thank you for posting these old photos. It's very interesting to see what Hawaii was like back then. I really enjoyed looking at these photos.
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11-02-2011, 04:21 PM
Post: #4
RE: Kona Coast
Thanks Bob for posting such interest information and pics. We don't get to see much of detail like this.
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