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Disaster's Elsewhere -Nebraska
06-26-2011, 07:57 PM (This post was last modified: 12-17-2015 01:15 PM by eleakai.)
Post: #11
Photo RE: Disaster's Elsewhere -Nebraska
The destruction left from flooding a farm field is hearbreaking. In the pics below, the ground that you see was probably a level as a baseball field. The pipe structure is what we call a pivot irrigation system. This pipe is a huge sprinker that travels around or pivets around a water well. It requires a near level surface for the wheels to travel on. No longer as you can see. Additionly, where is the dirt that once filled the huge cracks in the ground? Ever hear of the mud flats at the mouth of the Mississippi River at New Orleans?
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06-27-2011, 10:31 PM
Post: #12
RE: Disaster's Elsewhere -Nebraska
Thanks for posting the new link to the picasa photo album. These pictures really give you an idea of the situation there. It looks shocking and it's a scary thought in case more water is on its way.

That's crazy about these new pictures that you posted. Yes indeed, where did the soil go? Yes, probably it will all get deposited in the mud flats.
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06-28-2011, 07:25 PM
Post: #13
RE: Disaster's Elsewhere -Nebraska
In the news today was that the water is 6 feet above flood stage and that the large sand bag filling crew of volunteers were dwindling. The job is anything but done. The officials are still saying that water was seeping into the the power plants, there was no danger ....."no"
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07-04-2011, 09:54 PM
Post: #14
RE: Disaster's Elsewhere -Nebraska
Has the situation improved? It's strange that they don't think that water flowing into a power plant doesn't pose a threat. Maybe they just want to keep the public calm.
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07-05-2011, 06:48 PM
Post: #15
RE: Disaster's Elsewhere -Nebraska
This afternoon the river measured at 35 feet (whatever that means) but it was 6 feet above flood stage at Omaha. I believe that they said on the radio that Omaha has spent something like 7 million on flood prevention (sand bags basically)
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07-07-2011, 03:48 PM (This post was last modified: 05-12-2017 01:06 PM by eleakai.)
Post: #16
RE: Disaster's Elsewhere -Nebraska
Today included a trip to Nebraska City, NE for an appointment. While there we took a few pics, limited by close access to the river.

The first is a movie, which displays the volume of water traveling down the river channel. This pic is taken about 120 miles downstream from the closest South Dakota dam that is releasing water.


Look at the talk bubbles I have inserted. We are standing 100 higher than the river. The first marker shows how wide the river channel normally is. Width at this point is approximately 200 yards. The next marker shows (the little white line) the water that is 4 to 5 miles away. The final one points out the Iowa Bluffs (created by the glacier) which are perhaps 300-400 feet tall and probably about 6 miles away. The Iowa Interstate N-S highway 29 (which is closed and under water) is about 5 miles away.


The final pic is one taken from the barricades which close US highway 2. It is a major connector between Nebraska and Iowa Interstate systems. You will see that the highway disappears under water after it crosses the river bridge. Highway 2 would be underwater all of the way to the interstate or approximately 4 miles or more.


Impact? The flood waters are expected to continue until October , 2011. I assume that is when the mountain snow melt ceases. People will be out of the homes for at least a year. Most of the area now flooded has never seen a flood since records began in 1920 so many do not have flood insurance. Earthen Dikes built 50-70 years ago for flood control were estimated to withstand a 2 week flood. It is now nearing 2 months since the flood began and expected to continue another 3 or 4 months. When those dikes deteriorate and break, even more land will be flooded.
Roads and highways will loose their substrate or structure and will need to be rebuilt when the water finally subsides. When ? Perhaps another year. How? only money.
Area impacted? A guess from the hip, 1000 square miles. or the equivalent of Rhode Island and the District of Columbia; or if more meaninful, an area equal to New York City, Los Angeles and Chicago combined.

There is very little national news coverage, I suppose, due to the fact that there aren’t any major cities involved. When the market prices for grains, meats and ethanol used in gasoline reach the public. It will no doubt get some attention. Adding to this impact is the one born by the Federal budget for disaster relief. It was a section of the federal government that made the wise decision not to release manageable amounts of water from their dams and not wait until they faced destruction to release huge amounts of water down the Missouri River…… thus causing this disaster.
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07-09-2011, 08:59 PM
Post: #17
RE: Disaster's Elsewhere -Nebraska
Wow these pics really show the extend of the damage. Thanks for posting them here. Yes, not much coverage in the news about this disaster. It must be really bad for the people there whose homes are destroyed and who don't have insurance.
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07-10-2011, 05:22 PM
Post: #18
RE: Disaster's Elsewhere -Nebraska
It really is and they are so frustrated in the amount of reliable dialog they are getting from the feds. The good part is that no-one has been injured (except for a sore back in handling sand bags) through all of this event.

The current release of water over the Gavins Point Dam, immediately up-river from Iowa\Nebraska is 160,000 cubic feet per Second. In order to picture how much water that really is, 160,000 cu' is equal to 21,390 gallons or the same as a nice sized backyard swimming pool. That is one swimming pool per second or 60 pools per minute, or 2440 pools per hour and something like 146,000 swimming pools per day. Railroad trains (at 100 cars per train) filled with water would be expelled at a rate of 1 every 3 seconds; and that is 20 per minute and 28,800 trainloads per day.

That is a LOT of water.

These release of water is above or more than the water entering the reservoir. It was probably a prudent decision to reduce the water in the reservoir, increasing it's capacity in the event of emergency. What the hey, it is the same people at the corp of engineers that made the last prudent decision to hold water back until it force flooded a large section of Iowa.
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07-14-2011, 07:19 PM
Post: #19
RE: Disaster's Elsewhere -Nebraska
Yes, that is really a LOT of water! Thanks for the comparison to swimming pools and train loads. That makes it easier to imagine how much water that is. No wonder the entire area has been so flooded.
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07-15-2011, 05:40 PM
Post: #20
RE: Disaster's Elsewhere -Nebraska
The water level has gone down a little less than a foot. The people in the know are now saying that the drastic snow melt is now run it's course. The corps are continuing to release that same amount of water until August 1st.
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