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Basic island 123
01-23-2011, 08:15 PM
Post: #1
Basic island 123
Reminded of my first trip to the Islands, I knew very little about them other than they were recently added to these United States of America. I knew that Arthur Godfrey greeting folks from the ballroom of the Royal Hawaiian Hotel on Waikiki Beach. I had no idea that Hawaii was not the Hawaii I thought I was going to Wink
In other words, I thought that Waikiki was in Hawaii but didn’t know it was not on Hawaii. Sound familiar?
All that I knew was the a plane was going to take me for a long ride and hoped that it remembered how to get us home again.

It would have been much better prepared for our first visit if I were more knowledgeable about Hawaii before going, but then there wasn’t a lot of ready information at that time. Most of what I knew was from old news reels of WWII or in travel package brochures.

So, let’s talk a little about Hawaii before I talk about mostly Maui.

Although the Hawaiian chain has about as many islands as Minnesota has lakes, the majority of them might not be much bigger than a Volkswagen Beadle. About a dozen or so of them are large enough to inhabited by some form of life. The four major islands , capable of hosting large numbers of visitors are Kauai, Oahu, Maui and Hawaii (also referred to as the Big Island suppose to save confusion in conversations). The State of Hawaii claims 137 isles as part of the state.

In the same order, that list also represents the age of the island, with Kauai being the oldest and Hawaii (BI) the youngest. Well almost that is. Loihi is in formation but is still over three miles deep on the ocean floor. Unless there is a major change. It will be a long long time before it surfaces from the ocean. It is located near the Big Island.

The list is also in order of the size of the islands, Kauai the smallest and the BI the largest. In fact the BI is much larger than all of the other islands added together.

The state capitol city is Honolulu, located on Oahu, not the Big Island.

Maui was actually formed in the eruption of two volcanoes. West Maui and East Maui were joined by the flow of lava from both volcanoes. The conjunction is called Central Maui.
Haleakala is the larger of the two and peaks at 10,023 feet about sea level. It has been estimated to have erupted last in the 17th century, or the same century that the mainland was first receiving immigrants. You can see that it was recent history when the last eruption occurred. I believe that Haleakala is considered the largest “dormant” volcano west of Pocatello Idaho or something like that Smile (in fact I believe in the world). Dormant means that , yes , it could indeed erupt again, but of course not without a great deal of warning.

The trip to the summit of Haleakala is a great excursion with great views on along the trip.

Maui Today

Maui’s source of income in early years was as sea ports for traders and whale hunters. In the years that followed, agriculture (sugar and pineapple) and livestock became a large factor in the economy of the island and employment. Now, while there is less sugar cane grown for exportation and further processing, pineapple crops are mainly used for island use, rather than export. During the early 20th century corn was raised. It now is gaining ground again, mainly for the production of corn seed. The maturity time of corn is about a third or less than a crop of pineapple. Hence it is more economical and makes better use of the ground, as far as agriculture is concerned.

Tourism has become the major industry for Maui and it’s 100,000 + residents.

I have never been anywhere that a Smile is so catching. It must surely be their #2 export !
Rich

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01-23-2011, 08:34 PM
Post: #2
RE: Basic island 123
Thanks a lot Rich for this very informative post. I can only imagine how Hawaii must have looked like in the 1960s. Do you have any pictures from this time period when you first visited? I would love to see them! In the less than a decade that I'm in Hawaii now, I have seen many changes. But that's nothing compared to how many things have changed since Hawaii became a state (and even before that). So this is a very interesting topic for me.
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01-24-2011, 02:38 AM (This post was last modified: 01-24-2011 02:40 AM by WonderinginWaikiki.)
Post: #3
RE: Basic island 123
Aloha Rich,
This thread is a very good read and just loved it. As with other sites,I'm the scientific one and I'm always happy to offer the science behind on how volcanos,tsunamis,earthquakes and hurricanes work.
Our earth has weak points in the earth's crust and some of them are stationary that we can call "hotspots". In the case of the Hawaiian Islands, We have several crustal plates but the main two here in the Pacific Rim is The North American and the Pacific plates. The plates keep moving while the location of these hotspots remain the same. So so Kauai was formed while it was over this hotspot but yet the plates continue to move. Then Oahu was formed,the Maui,then the Big Island. Now we have a rare constantly active volcano since 1983 without explosive eruptions like most volcanoes do.As the plates are still moving, now we have a new island forming named Loihi. For now,it's a submarine volcano. This volcano will continue to get stronger and taller as the plates continue to move the Big Island past the crustal hotspot.
It is believed that the volcanoes on Oahu and Maui will never erupt again,for they have traveled past the crustal hotspot. It is questionable whether Loihi will erupt into a explosive volcano that reaches the surface of the Pacific Ocean during our lifetime.
I believe that volcanoes effect the earth in two extreme manners. When a volcano has a major and violent eruption,It puts out enough ash to effect our sunsets for years and also lowers the earths surface temperature. On the flipside of this and I believe besides man,volcanoes today just might be a large part of our current global warming effect. As volcanoes erupt,they increase the amount of surface crust above ocean levels,which seems to me would make the earth warmer. I still believe like everyone else, that CO2 produced by mankind is speeding up the process, but yet,it would take only one super volcano eruption to turn that around. Look at how much larger the Big Island has grown in surface area over the past 30 years alone. This is only two volcanoes or three if you count Loihi too. There is actually hundreds of them around the world today,all of them creating more crustal surface areas, For every action,there is a reaction. Even our weather patterns around the earth has change dramatically over the last 30 years also. Can volcanoes share the blame with us for Global Warming?
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01-24-2011, 05:54 AM
Post: #4
RE: Basic island 123
(01-24-2011 02:38 AM)WonderinginWaikiki Wrote:  Aloha Rich,
This thread is a very good read and just loved it. As with other sites,I'm the scientific one and I'm always happy to offer the science behind on how volcanos,tsunamis,earthquakes and hurricanes work.
Our earth has weak points in the earth's crust and some of them are stationary that we can call "hotspots". In the case of the Hawaiian Islands, We have several crustal plates but the main two here in the Pacific Rim is The North American and the Pacific plates. The plates keep moving while the location of these hotspots remain the same. So so Kauai was formed while it was over this hotspot but yet the plates continue to move. Then Oahu was formed,the Maui,then the Big Island. Now we have a rare constantly active volcano since 1983 without explosive eruptions like most volcanoes do.As the plates are still moving, now we have a new island forming named Loihi. For now,it's a submarine volcano. This volcano will continue to get stronger and taller as the plates continue to move the Big Island past the crustal hotspot.
It is believed that the volcanoes on Oahu and Maui will never erupt again,for they have traveled past the crustal hotspot. It is questionable whether Loihi will erupt into a explosive volcano that reaches the surface of the Pacific Ocean during our lifetime.
I believe that volcanoes effect the earth in two extreme manners. When a volcano has a major and violent eruption,It puts out enough ash to effect our sunsets for years and also lowers the earths surface temperature. On the flipside of this and I believe besides man,volcanoes today just might be a large part of our current global warming effect. As volcanoes erupt,they increase the amount of surface crust above ocean levels,which seems to me would make the earth warmer. I still believe like everyone else, that CO2 produced by mankind is speeding up the process, but yet,it would take only one super volcano eruption to turn that around. Look at how much larger the Big Island has grown in surface area over the past 30 years alone. This is only two volcanoes or three if you count Loihi too. There is actually hundreds of them around the world today,all of them creating more crustal surface areas, For every action,there is a reaction. Even our weather patterns around the earth has change dramatically over the last 30 years also. Can volcanoes share the blame with us for Global Warming?

Great thoughts Todd. Yes you do have an interest in science. I have noticed that previously.
You maybe have a longer life expectancy than I do. The expected surfacing of Loihi is guessed at 10,000 to 100,000 years and has probably been forming for an estimated 400,000 years.
Yes, I agree by effect of the gases introduced into the "air", might well have an effect on the ozone layer. I didn't observe the water much warmer when snorkeling in November. LOL
The over a billion cigarette smokers on earth might have an effect on it too.Smile I read somewhere while in Hawaii recently that the caldera is actually lowering and the crater base is farther from the surface today than it was yesterday.

Okay, that the extent of my knowledge of about volcanoes. Actually I am still trying to get past the scare effect that California falling off into the ocean, but has been a great subject matter for the scifi movies. Smile
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01-24-2011, 04:30 PM
Post: #5
RE: Basic island 123
Ah,the San Andres Fault that runs north and south in California separates 3-5 inches a year and yes,places like Thousand Palms,California could very well become oceanfront property someday. Half of California will never just fall into the ocean as people say,instead,that half will become an island off the coast of California as the North America plates moves west. I can honestly say that there will be many more high end scale earthquakes and tsunamis before that will happen though. The state of Hawaii will see an increase in the number of tsunamis as these plates move and suddenly release tension.
The more recent talk lately has been about the "super tsunamis" that will come from underwater landslides off of the south point of the Big Island. In which case,living here in Honolulu,we would have about 30 minutes to get to safety but a 1000 foot wave is very hard to run away from in less than 30 minutes. The scary part of these is that there isn't much of a warning from these. Might get a 2.5 to a 6.0 to register but by the time the USGS reads the data and figures it out,the super tsunami would be upon us already. Too late....
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